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E

EFL: English as a Foreign Language.  The acronym is used to refer to the field of English as a foreign language or to courses, classes and/or programs designed for students learning English as an additional language.  It is used to refer to students who are learning English for purposes of study, travel, work and/or personal interest reasons.

 
Elementary: Students at this level may have a vocabulary of up to 1000 words and will probably be learning or practicing the present simple and present continuous tenses, past simple and present perfect, will/shall, 'going to' futures.  They should be able to hold simple conversations and survive in everyday situations.
 
ELL:  English Language Learner
 
Error analysis:  In this procedure, samples of learner language are collected and the errors are identified, described, and classified according to their hypothesized causes.  The errors are then evaluated for relative seriousness.
 
ESL:  English as a Second Language.  The acronym is used to refer to the field of English as a second language or to courses, classes and/or programs designed for students learning English as an additional language.  It is used to refer to students who are learning English because they have immigrated to an English-speaking country.
 
ESOL:  English to/for Speakers of Other Languages
 
ESOL Student: These are school-age learners, studying in the medium of English, who are identified as still in the process of acquiring English as an additional language.  They may not speak English at all, or they do not speak, understand, and write English with the same facility as their classmates because they did not grow up speaking English or because they spoke another language at home.
 
ESP:  English for Special Purposes (e.g., English language used especially in the contexts of business, science and technology, medicine etc)
 
Experiential:   Experiential is used to describe ways of learning language by experiencing it in use rather than by focusing conscious attention on language items and rules.  Reading a novel, listening to a song and taking part in a project are experiential ways of language learning.
 
Extensive Reading:  This term is used in two different ways.  It can refer to reading longer texts, often for a general understanding.  It is also used to refer to the reading students do outside of class for pleasure.  It is important that students be encouraged to read for pleasure because the reading provides them with language input and information about the culture of the language they are learning.
 
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